SHARED: “No Happy Harmony” by Elizabeth C. Corey

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“Both the ethical imperatives I’ve described—“must work” and “must stay at home”—reflect noble desires, the one for talents fully used and the other for the vocation of motherhood. But I worry that both are too often promoted ideologically, prescribed as answers to the anxieties young women naturally feel about what they should do. This problem is especially pressing for those high-achieving college students I have been describing, who cannot imagine doing anything—be it career or motherhood—halfheartedly.” via No Happy Harmony by Elizabeth C. Corey

As you might already know, the topic of motherhood and vocation has been on my mind and heart lately and Dr. Corey’s insight in this article from First Things exposes the root of tension that I feel almost daily.

It’s about a 20 minute read (well, if you’re a slow reader like me) but well worth it…grab a cup of something warm and dive in.

Too Late?

illustration Michelle Rial _Too Late

This illustration by Michelle Rial made me smile because, as I’ve hinted at recently, I deal with this fear a lot.

I’m staring down my email inbox on a Monday morning, organizing my class workload for the week, and wondering if it’s too early to make myself a second espresso (it’s 9:30am, I think not.) This isn’t what I thought my mid-thirties would look like. Being back in freaking college? All the lol’s.

Continue reading “Too Late?”

SHARED: How To Write by Elizabeth Gilbert — via swissmiss

1) Tell your story TO someone. Pick one person you love or admire or want to connect with, and write the whole thing directly to them —like you’re writing a letter. 327 more words

I caught this on Elizabeth Gilbert’s Instagram account last week and loved it so much that I stashed it in my “Saved” tab. So glad to catch it here via swissmiss and be able to share it with y’all.  For the full post: How To Write by Elizabeth Gilbert — swissmiss

Dorothy Sayers on Work

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Dorothy Sayers on the spiritual, cultural, and ecclesiastical value of work–

“The first is that you cannot do good work if you take your mind off the work to see how the community is taking it – any more than you can make a good drive from the tee if you take your eye off the ball. “Blessed are the single hearted: (for that is the real meaning of the word we translate “the pure in heart”). If your heart is not wholly in the work, the work will not be good – and work that is not good serves neither God nor the community; it only serves mammon.”

For the full essay (preserved online), click here.